DECAF New modern coffee platform

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A non-caffeine called Decaf. A lost one without excitement in the turbulent world of passion and emotion. A weird guy tries to keep its characteristics despite choosing to change. A coffee bean with a pure heart. It changes to make friends with like-mind people.



WHAT IS DECAF COFFEE?

Decaffeinated coffee — known to most as “decaf” — isn’t just a regular coffee. It does not have caffeine.

The decaffeination process typically removes around 97-99 % of the caffein and that, on average, decaf coffee has 3 milligrams of caffeine per cup compared to the 85 milligrams in a regular cup of coffee — which is a considerable amount if you’re sensitive to caffeine.

It’s believed that decaf coffee was discovered in the 1900s when a shipment of coffee beans was soaked in seawater during transit, which naturally extracted some of the caffeine.

Shortly after, the merchant who happened upon the mishap recreated these magic beans using a chemical solvent called benzene, an ingredient that is a major component of gasoline and also found in volcanoes.

The decaffeination process starts with unroasted beans (fun fact: the beans are green pre-roasting), which are initially soaked in water to dissolve the caffeine. Then, it can follow three primary methods.

1. First up is the one with those pesky chemicals. Methylene chloride, which is used in paint removers (yikes), or ethyl acetate, which is used in glue and nail polish removers (double yikes), are used to remove the caffeine from the water by either adding them to the mix of coffee and water (the “direct” process) or by removing the water from the beans and then adding them to the water mixture (the “indirect” process). The final step is the same, which is evaporating the water so the flavor remains in the beans.

2. Another method, called the Swiss Water Process, uses a charcoal filter to remove the caffeine from the water, making it 100-percent chemical-free.

3. The third process also keeps things chemical-free by using liquid carbon dioxide to dissolve the caffeine.

Though the latter methods may sound preferable, the amount of chemicals remaining at the end of the first decaffeination method is minimal and has been deemed safe by the FDA.

No matter your preference, since labels aren’t required to disclose the method used, it’s hard to say what you’re getting — unless you opt for organic, which is solvent-free.

> https43factory.coffee/en/decaf-a-pioneer-with-a-pure-heart-.html
 
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